Keep us running!
Order HD Helmet HERO at GoPro.com
 
Next Event: AAS Round 1
  
  
Home » Bay Area Autocross Forum » Tech/Setup » Flat Tappet Camshaft Longevity and Your Lawn Equipment
Flat Tappet Camshaft Longevity and Your Lawn Equipment [message #122430] Sun, 04 November 2018 07:14 Go to next message
atcovan is currently offline  atcovan   
Messages: 3085
Registered: December 2006
Location: North Highlands
Top Time of Day
CONTRIBUTOR

From: *lightspeed.frokca.sbcglobal.net
I was reading about the wear problems 4-cycle engines using older, non-roller follower camshaft technology can suffer with the latest SN rated, low zinc oils. Is this also a concern for lawn and garden engines as well as generators, too? Should I (we) be using racing oils in these engines?

Jim
Re: Flat Tappet Camshaft Longevity and Your Lawn Equipment [message #122431 is a reply to message #122430] Sun, 04 November 2018 16:07 Go to previous messageGo to next message
pault1 is currently offline  pault1   
Messages: 912
Registered: October 2005
Location: San Remote
Top PAX
CONTRIBUTOR

From: *lightspeed.sntcca.sbcglobal.net
atcovan wrote on Sun, 04 November 2018 07:14
I was reading about the wear problems 4-cycle engines using older, non-roller follower camshaft technology can suffer with the latest SN rated, low zinc oils. Is this also a concern for lawn and garden engines as well as generators, too? Should I (we) be using racing oils in these engines?


Hmm, interesting. A short search found this Hot Rod article that is like 11 years old https://www.hotrod.com/articles/flat-tappet-cam-tech/. OTOH, I would think that lawn/garden engines would not be built with the high cam pressures of modern car engines, though flat tappet tech, the oldest, does have higher characteristic pressures. OTO,OH I have been reading up on generators and some, especially the less expensive ones (coughHarborFreightcough) have issues with break-in not going well, and while manufacturing/design/quality may be factors there is something to be said for modern oils and low zinc being involved.

I think that rather than putting out for racing oil, you could use a break-in additive like Red Line Engine Oil Break-In Additive, though compare the cost of that versus using racing oil. No catalysts on the engines you're talking about so no problem with fouling from the zinc.


Paul T. Ford body, Yamaha power - describes my car pretty well, too! Smile Returned to racing the STi-STU but still that #35 you love
Re: Flat Tappet Camshaft Longevity and Your Lawn Equipment [message #122432 is a reply to message #122431] Sun, 04 November 2018 16:17 Go to previous message
atcovan is currently offline  atcovan   
Messages: 3085
Registered: December 2006
Location: North Highlands
Top Time of Day
CONTRIBUTOR

From: *lightspeed.frokca.sbcglobal.net
Thanks for taking the time, Paul. I had wondered if the low spring pressure made this a non-issue. I think Valvoline has an affordable racing oil which has a really pretty blue tint. And I like blue. As the typical device uses less than 1 quart, cost is no biggie, as well.

Jim
Previous Topic: Transmission Oil Cooler Placement
Next Topic: The list for "Where to get tire?"
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Sun Nov 18 07:25:08 PST 2018

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.00858 seconds